Why I like developers life podcast?

Why I like developers life podcasts? This article about developers life podcast, because this is the most powerfull feature in the developer life when you can listen well-known people with more than 10 (sometimes 20) years expirience. You can learn many new things, information and you can stay tuned with new technologies and methodologies. 

Why I like developers life podcast?

What this podcasts about?

Here information from podcasts preview... Scott and I talk to 3 developers who have pulled off some pretty audacious maneuvers:

  • John Resig, Creator of jQuery, decided to write yet another javascript framework when there were already quite a few to choose from. Not only did he succeed, he changed web development forever.
  • Alex Payne, former API Developer Lead at Twitter, talks about the (somewhat insane) move to leave Twitter, and (somewhat more insane) choice to “reinvent banking” with BankSimple.
  • Miguel de Icaza, founder of the GNOME project and creator of Mono talks about creating a clone of the .NET framework - all because he didn’t like what else was out there at the time for Linux.

Scott and I discuss “what you need to know” as a software developer. How many layers of abstraction do you need to understand? How many geek trading cards should you have in your collection? To find out more, we talked to 3 prominent, living-history developers:

  • Ward Cunningham - creator of the Wiki and major figure in Agile/XP programming
  • Charles Petzold - author of many books about Windows and prominent speaker
  • Dan Bricklin - “Superman” according to Scott. Creator of the spreadsheet and all around amazing guy.

Scott Hanselman and we explore the idea of “being mean” - and what makes people mean in our industry. In the first story Scott shares his experience on being “outted” at a former company, where his name sat beside 7 of the 10 top entries on a list of “what not to do to code”. Scott then interviews Cyra Richardson - a program manager at Microsoft with a rather strong opinion about the changes she’s seen in the company over the last 20 years. Scott and I talk to two developers who created something phenomenal: they hit a Homerun if you will. In the first story, I talk to David Heinemeier Hansson, creator of Ruby on Rails, partner at 37Signals, and author of Rework about the inspiration and shepherding of Ruby on Rails. In the second story, Scott talks to Dan Bricklin, who in the late 70s and early 80s helped to usher in the computer age, as well as a new industry. Dan is the creator of Visicalc - the first spreadsheet program. How do you solve problems as a developer? How do you tackle issues that seem completely unsolvable - as an individual or on a team? In this week’s This Developer’s Life that’s what I take a look at, from 3 perspectives:

Mike Moore (Ruby developer) talks about personal skills for solving problems, including the ability to ask a different question.

Javier Lozano (Microsoft developer) talks about teams coming together as a “band of brothers”, solving problems that may, or may not, exist.

Tamar Cohen (Java developer) shares her story of the unsolvable bug - something she *had to solve* as the exploration of other planets depends on it. She works at NASA, programming planetary rovers.

Scott and I talk to two developers who created something phenomenal: they hit a Homerun if you will. In the first story, I talk to David Heinemeier Hansson, creator of Ruby on Rails, partner at 37Signals, and author of Rework about the inspiration and shepherding of Ruby on Rails.

In the second story, Scott talks to Dan Bricklin, who in the late 70s and early 80s helped to usher in the computer age, as well as a new industry. Dan is the creator of Visicalc - the first spreadsheet program. They talk to 2 developers about the fame and how it relates to their career as developers. In the first story I talk to John Sheehan, a developer who’s active on Twitter and is establishing himself in the Open Source community.

The second story comes from Scott Hanselman - one of the biggest names (if not *the* biggest) in the Microsoft community. Scott Hanselman and we explore the idea of “being mean” - and what makes people mean in our industry. In the first story Scott shares his experience on being “outted” at a former company, where his name sat beside 7 of the 10 top entries on a list of “what not to do to code”. Scott then interviews Cyra Richardson - a program manager at Microsoft with a rather strong opinion about the changes she’s seen in the company over the last 20 years. Finally, I spend some time talking to Giles Bowkett and his various … “interesting” interactions with the Ruby community.

How do you solve problems as a developer? How do you tackle issues that seem completely unsolvable - as an individual or on a team?

developers life podcast

In this week’s This Developer’s Life that’s what I take a look at, from 3 perspectives:

Mike Moore (Ruby developer) talks about personal skills for solving problems, including the ability to ask a different question.

Javier Lozano (Microsoft developer) talks about teams coming together as a “band of brothers”, solving problems that may, or may not, exist.

Tamar Cohen (Java developer) shares her story of the unsolvable bug - something she *had to solve* as the exploration of other planets depends on it. She works at NASA, programming planetary rovers.

In the first story I talk to John Sheehan, a developer who’s active on Twitter and is establishing himself in the Open Source community.

The second story comes from Scott Hanselman - one of the biggest names (if not *the* biggest) in the Microsoft community.

This is the very first episode of a little experiment of mine - telling stories about development following in the footsteps (perhaps a little too closely) of my favorite podcast: This American Life.

The first episode is devoted to a bit of darkness: Thoughts on Getting Fired. Thought it would be an interesting topic… why not…

Music

There are a number of tracks in this episode, many of which are “mashups” or “boots”. These tracks aren’t … “appreciated” by the recording industry, yet they realize that they sell many of the songs they feature.

I won’t link my sources here - however I will say all of them are found on Youtube if you want to search for them. Some are also found on the DJ’s websites:

The following music is used under Creative Commons:

Most of the music in this podcast is released under Creative Commons, including:

In addition - super short clips of the following songs were used under Fair Use:

The music used in this podcast is released under Creative Commons - specifically:

As always - I encourage you to buy the tracks below if you like what you hear. This is my part to stay within Fair Use of this music. I don’t make any money on this podcast - give your spare change to the artists instead.

If you like any of the songs - please support my efforts to stay within “Fair Use” by buying them… I’d very much appreciate it. 

Most of the music in this podcast is released under Creative Commons, including:

In addition - super short clips of the following songs were used under Fair Use:

The music used in this podcast is released under Creative Commons - specifically:

As always - I encourage you to buy the tracks below if you like what you hear. This is my part to stay within Fair Use of this music. I don’t make any money on this podcast - give your spare change to the artists instead.

UPDATE: Here’s the track listing

Rob Conery and Scott Hanselman

Rob Conery work at Microsoft. He is the Creator of SubSonic and was the Chief Architect of the Commerce Starter Kit (a free, Open Source eCommerce platform for .NET). He live in Kauai and writing things on his blog (giving away secrets of incalculable value).

developers life podcast

developers life podcast

Scott Hanselman work out of home office for Microsoft as a Principal Program Manager, aiming to spread good information about developing software, usually on the Microsoft stack. Before this he was the Chief Architect at Corillian Corporation, now a part of Checkfree, for 6+ years. He was also involved in a few Microsoft Developer things for many years like the MVP and RD programs and I'll speak about computers (and other passions) whenever someone will listen.

References

Scott Hanselmann Blog

WekeRoad Rob Conery Blog

This developers life web site

Your can fine mini player on my page with all podcasts available here, you can listen them on my site, but you should not change the page.

Here my link to Developer's Life podcast

Thoughts on getting fired

Bean mean

Problems

Fame and Notoriety

Home Run

Summary

Why I like developers life podcasts?So many times I've been sitting around a table with other developers as we regale each other with our stories, and someone says, "If we had recorded this, it would have been such a great podcast episode." Rob has done exactly that. Each week's show has several parts, all based on a central theme (just like "This American Life"), and the discussions feel so natural - like you're overhearing a fascinating lunch conversation between really interesting developers. The stories are great, the musical selections are great, and the production values are pretty darn good compared to most other .NET tech podcasts. I hope Rob finds the time to keep this up!". I like this podcast, because espessially for me Scott Hanselman making huge influence with his consultantion, his blog and his life. Developers life podcast is relly nice, because they include such a great music and people speaking in not formal atmosphere. Keep it up guys, ther you for all. Do you like developers life podcasts?

developers life podcast

Comments (4) -

  • ruby on rails

    1/5/2011 8:29:02 AM | Reply

    I really like all people who has taken part for ruby on rails development

  • Slava Agafonov

    1/8/2011 10:15:42 PM | Reply

    Yea, David Heinemeier Hansson, creator of Ruby on Rails, partner at 37Signals, and author of Rework about the inspiration and shepherding of Ruby on Rails.

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